Upon Westminster Bridge | Descriptive Questions | WBCHSE Class XI | Set- 1

Descriptive Question and Answer from Upon Westminster Bridge

1.  “A sight so touching in its majesty What is the ‘sight’ referred to here? How does the poet describe the ‘sight’?


,,,, The ‘sight’, referred to here, is the sight of London city in the early morning of September 3rd in 1802.

The nature lover poet William Wordsworth is moved by the beauty of London city in the early morning. From Westminster Bridge, London looks beautiful in the light of the rising sun. It seems as if the City of London is wearing a beautiful garment made by the beauty of the early morning. Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples are glittering in the smokeless air. The calmness of the morning was such that the poet never felt before. The river namely Thames is personified in such a way that it seems like it is flowing ‘at its own sweet will’. The restful condition of a busy city like London overwhelms the poet. Thus the line expresses the poet’s joy at the beauty of early morning London.


2.  The river glideth at his own sweet will What is the significance of this line?

,,,,,, This line has been taken from Wordsworth’s literary work “Upon Westminster Bridge”. The river, referred to here, is the Thames river. The Thames has been described in it glittering state in the early morning sunshine. The sight of glittering Thames touches Wordsworth’s heart so much that he is compelled to personify the river as a living. The speed of the stream of the Thames River near the City of London becomes slow. So the poet imagines that the river is not in any kind of hurry and it flowing ‘at its own sweet will’. This depicts the co-existence of man and nature.

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3.  Never did the sun more beautifully steep 
      In its first splendour… Briefly explain the significance of this line?

,,,,,,,, Standing on the Westminster Bridge Wordsworth witnesses the beauty of London city in the early morning. He feels fortunate enough to experience the calmness and the freshness of the sight. In the morning, the sky is smoke-free and dust-free which is not very usual for a busy city like London. Therefore the sun is shining brightly and glorifies each and every object in the city. Here the ‘first splendour’ refers to the first rays of the sun. The magnificent beauty appeals to the poet’s heart and he becomes speechless by seeing the sun’s ‘first splendour’. The poet tries to express his feeling through these lines.

4.  The city now doth like a garment wear… Explain the line in the context of the poem.

Or,

What does the poet mean by this line? Which is referred to here?

,,,, The poet uses a fine simile to express the beauty of the City of  London in the early morning which he watches from the Westminster Bridge. The city seems to wear a garment, made of the beauty of early morning freshness and calmness. The bright light of the sun covers the whole city which makes the city very beautiful. Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples are glittering in the smokeless air. The poet is greatly pleased to observe this beauty of London

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Here the city, referred to, is London.

 

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